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15 Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line to the Infinite 2016 인기글 Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line to the Infinite   By Raul Zamudio   curator Liverpool Biennial, Venice Biennial     The exploration of a formal or thematic leitmotif is not an uncommon endeavor in modern and contemporary art. There are, for instance, aesthetically diverse artists such as Mike Kelley who worked in a broad range of media including painting, photography, work-on-paper, sculpture, video, installation, sound art and a mixture of these. And though the narratives of his works are as equally eclectic, his foci have been the investigation of a kind of Gothic, sinister and culturally entropic Americana in its myriad neurotic manifestations. On the other hand is Picasso whose historically imperative Cubism was short lived and succeeding work one could consider post-Cubist, nonetheless engaged themes of a topical as well as personal nature. In one sense, this is how one should approach the recent body of work of the artist Eel Kwon Kim. That is, as one who delves deeply into form to the degree that he has created a distinct aesthetic vocabulary, yet his signature style is protean in its ability to articulate a broad purview of subject matter.   Kim has formally explored a thematic with a razor sharp singularity yet evinces a high level of artistic accomplishment. His early works were anything but indistinguishable. Artistically incorporating vestiges of Mark Rothko’s prescient Color-Field to Robert Ryman’s monochromes, Kim’s early paintings consisted of rectangular canvases awash in two dominate colors which meet at a demarcated line that horizontally bisects the canvas; or by an area in which the two dominate hues bleed into each other. More recently, Kim expanded on this where the purity of his color fields were contaminated with offset colors thus giving his nebulous pictorial zones depth by way of chromatic palpability. As much as these canvases can be read as embodiments of pure abstraction, the delineated line or passage between large areas of color cannot resist being perceived as a horizon. What one could conclude, then, is what Kim renders is a kind of dialectical painting that formally and conceptually oscillates dichotomies of pure abstraction and representation, figure and ground, presence and absence, and being and nothingness. As if these thematic points of departure were not revelatory of the complex artistic imaginary, the early works were also given titles referring to the day they were painted including June 20, 2003 and October 30, 2003, for example. The titles serve more than demarcations of time, however, for they not only encapsulate the arc of their creation but are also metaphorically embedded, to a lesser of greater degree, with the interiority of their author on the day of their manufacture. This contextualization of the early work of Eel Kwon Kim serves as touchstone to help us understand the artist’s most recent exhibition titled Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line, which was held from January 9-22, 2015 at the Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Gallery in New York City.   The exhibition was one of the most demure yet ambitious shows of New York City’s fall and winter season for numerous reasons. The exhibition commenced with interesting curatorial strategies: the presentation was, in a very idiosyncratic way, a macrocosm of what one finds in his early paintings. That is, the delineated line or chromatic passage between the two registers of color present in Kim’s canvases, are now incarnated in the works themselves as they sequentially cut a line across the exhibition walls. And the two areas of adjacent color that exist on either side of his paintings are not only the areas above and below them in the exhibition, but the voluminous gallery where people move about, view the artworks, and engage with each other. In short, it is the space of life itself.  This conceptual undercurrent is employed as foil in Kim’s art and by extension, is part and parcel of his approach to painting as well. There is a sublime quality to Kim’s modus operandi and like any art of a rigorous order, it is often not ostensibly apparent.  Nonetheless, Kim’s paintings of years past and of the moment encompass an aesthetic dimension and a visual poetics and logic that convey subject matter of a philosophical nature, among other narratives.   While the exhibition is a unified whole, Kim has introduced myriad works that take his previous paintings in altogether different conceptual direction. One group of canvases maintains the formal device of the bisected line, but in this case the artist covered their surfaces with an opaque wash imbuing them with a mysterious yet sensuous atmosphere. If we continue to read these new paintings as abstracted landscapes, these surface effects not only give the paintings depth but also create a mist that heightens the tension between representation and pure abstraction. The specter that Kim permeates his pictures with is like an aesthetic phantom in its haunting visual ectoplasm. Think of Leonardo Da Vinci’s sfumato, but in this case Kim has updated this trope with an altogether different connotation. To be sure, the mist that on finds in the painting is emphatically a formal device, but there is a certain degree of signification that permeates this monochromatic ambiance. In the wake of exceeding global pollution and contamination, then, is Kim addressing these matters in a work that is both visually exuberant as it is harrowing because of its potential subject matter? While one can only speculate as to the context of these particular paintings’ creation, Kim does present another body of work in the exhibition that may highlight what these works entail? These works are not as seemingly abstract and consist of imagery of black trees with different colored backgrounds including one in matte black finish and another in muted, lime green.     Reminiscent of Caspar David Friedrich’s Gothic cemetery landscapes, the vantage point in these two paintings is from below looking upward through a thicket of trees into a flattened sky. What is evoked, however, is not anything sinister but a truncated arbor of melancholy and pathos. Kim reminds us with artistic deftness and aplomb that nature is anything but natural. In other words, because nature is named by way of culture, that it too is a social construct. But Kim’s rendition of trees with their social subtext is not artistic relativism, for he extrapolates from them a sentience that is emotive and poetic.  Other works that stood out include a series of work-on-paper that were combined together to create a grid. The grid is a paradigm of Modernist abstraction evinced in the works of Piet Mondrian and his Neo-Plastic rhetoric encompassing such things as Theosophy and spiritualism and the reduction of form and color to a universal artistic vocabulary. Kim’s grid, however, alludes to a host of sources such as paint swatches, postcards, and other ephemera; yet, his gridded works are more intense in color and their configuration in the exhibition space feign stained glass that one would find in a church. In shifting through the profane and sacred, these works convey much about the status of painting today.  In one sense, this has been a concern of Kim since he took up the easel and brush, so to speak. This later statement is voiced self-consciously, for Kim is anything but the conventional painter. It is true that he may use the historical tropes of painting, but he continuously seeks newer modes of their reconfiguration clued from the most disparate of sources. And this is especially so in the most formally and conceptually ambitious artworks in the exhibition, which consist of a series of mixed media pieces that continue the motif of trees in a forest, but here the backgrounds were gray and superimposed with a thick white line.   Consisting of imagery of tree branches on printed canvas, these works were intervened with a white line that was slightly hallucinatory as it was conceptual.  The jarring imposition of white offset the branches yet the artworks seamlessly cohered together as a composition. Although one could see that the perspective was as if one was looking up through tree branches, as a vista into the unknown they were not dissimilar to Rodney Graham’s large-scale photographs of upside down trees.  The relationship between Graham and Kim has nothing to with media per se, but in the way that Kim was able to render something so innocuous as tree branches in an uncanny and unsettling manner. This was achieved by the highly mimetic rendition of the trees on the one hand, and on the other was the disruption of vision imposed by the white line. The white line also tended to destabilize the trees to the degree that they seemed to shape-shift into squiggles of pure abstraction. And in a very odd way, Kim has charted a kind of Mobius strip trajectory in returning to previous painterly strategies by way of their inversion: whereas the early works appear to materialize in the register of pure abstraction and then formally ebb into landscapes replete with horizons, the latter works addressed above start off adamantly representational and then seem to morph into the amorphous. In short, the works collectively embody well their exhibition’s puzzling and open-ended subtitle.              For without a doubt, Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line was an exceptional exhibition by an artist who continues to search for new and fresh ways to invigorate painting through the reconfiguration of historical modes of mark making. And these, of course, began from the first instances of delineated lines on the walls of the caves of Lascaux, to where now Eel Kwon Kim has currently extended them; that is to say, onto infinity.                By Raul Zamudio 10-25
14 Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line to the Infinite By Raul Zamudi… 인기글 Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line to the Infinite   By Raul Zamudio     The exploration of a formal or thematic leitmotif is not an uncommon endeavor in modern and contemporary art. There are, for instance, aesthetically diverse artists such as Mike Kelley who worked in a broad range of media including painting, photography, work-on-paper, sculpture, video, installation, sound art and a mixture of these. And though the narratives of his works are as equally eclectic, his foci have been the investigation of a kind of Gothic, sinister and culturally entropic Americana in its myriad neurotic manifestations. On the other hand is Picasso whose historically imperative Cubism was short lived and succeeding work one could consider post-Cubist, nonetheless engaged themes of a topical as well as personal nature. In one sense, this is how one should approach the recent body of work of the artist Eel Kwon Kim. That is, as one who delves deeply into form to the degree that he has created a distinct aesthetic vocabulary, yet his signature style is protean in its ability to articulate a broad purview of subject matter.   Kim has formally explored a thematic with a razor sharp singularity yet evinces a high level of artistic accomplishment. His early works were anything but indistinguishable. Artistically incorporating vestiges of Mark Rothko’s prescient Color-Field to Robert Ryman’s monochromes, Kim’s early paintings consisted of rectangular canvases awash in two dominate colors which meet at a demarcated line that horizontally bisects the canvas; or by an area in which the two dominate hues bleed into each other. More recently, Kim expanded on this where the purity of his color fields were contaminated with offset colors thus giving his nebulous pictorial zones depth by way of chromatic palpability. As much as these canvases can be read as embodiments of pure abstraction, the delineated line or passage between large areas of color cannot resist being perceived as a horizon. What one could conclude, then, is what Kim renders is a kind of dialectical painting that formally and conceptually oscillates dichotomies of pure abstraction and representation, figure and ground, presence and absence, and being and nothingness. As if these thematic points of departure were not revelatory of the complex artistic imaginary, the early works were also given titles referring to the day they were painted including June 20, 2003 and October 30, 2003, for example. The titles serve more than demarcations of time, however, for they not only encapsulate the arc of their creation but are also metaphorically embedded, to a lesser of greater degree, with the interiority of their author on the day of their manufacture. This contextualization of the early work of Eel Kwon Kim serves as touchstone to help us understand the artist’s most recent exhibition titled Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line, which was held from January 9-22, 2015 at the Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Gallery in New York City.   The exhibition was one of the most demure yet ambitious shows of New York City’s fall and winter season for numerous reasons. The exhibition commenced with interesting curatorial strategies: the presentation was, in a very idiosyncratic way, a macrocosm of what one finds in his early paintings. That is, the delineated line or chromatic passage between the two registers of color present in Kim’s canvases, are now incarnated in the works themselves as they sequentially cut a line across the exhibition walls. And the two areas of adjacent color that exist on either side of his paintings are not only the areas above and below them in the exhibition, but the voluminous gallery where people move about, view the artworks, and engage with each other. In short, it is the space of life itself.  This conceptual undercurrent is employed as foil in Kim’s art and by extension, is part and parcel of his approach to painting as well. There is a sublime quality to Kim’s modus operandi and like any art of a rigorous order, it is often not ostensibly apparent.  Nonetheless, Kim’s paintings of years past and of the moment encompass an aesthetic dimension and a visual poetics and logic that convey subject matter of a philosophical nature, among other narratives.   While the exhibition is a unified whole, Kim has introduced myriad works that take his previous paintings in altogether different conceptual direction. One group of canvases maintains the formal device of the bisected line, but in this case the artist covered their surfaces with an opaque wash imbuing them with a mysterious yet sensuous atmosphere. If we continue to read these new paintings as abstracted landscapes, these surface effects not only give the paintings depth but also create a mist that heightens the tension between representation and pure abstraction. The specter that Kim permeates his pictures with is like an aesthetic phantom in its haunting visual ectoplasm. Think of Leonardo Da Vinci’s sfumato, but in this case Kim has updated this trope with an altogether different connotation. To be sure, the mist that on finds in the painting is emphatically a formal device, but there is a certain degree of signification that permeates this monochromatic ambiance. In the wake of exceeding global pollution and contamination, then, is Kim addressing these matters in a work that is both visually exuberant as it is harrowing because of its potential subject matter? While one can only speculate as to the context of these particular paintings’ creation, Kim does present another body of work in the exhibition that may highlight what these works entail? These works are not as seemingly abstract and consist of imagery of black trees with different colored backgrounds including one in matte black finish and another in muted, lime green.     Reminiscent of Caspar David Friedrich’s Gothic cemetery landscapes, the vantage point in these two paintings is from below looking upward through a thicket of trees into a flattened sky. What is evoked, however, is not anything sinister but a truncated arbor of melancholy and pathos. Kim reminds us with artistic deftness and aplomb that nature is anything but natural. In other words, because nature is named by way of culture, that it too is a social construct. But Kim’s rendition of trees with their social subtext is not artistic relativism, for he extrapolates from them a sentience that is emotive and poetic.  Other works that stood out include a series of work-on-paper that were combined together to create a grid. The grid is a paradigm of Modernist abstraction evinced in the works of Piet Mondrian and his Neo-Plastic rhetoric encompassing such things as Theosophy and spiritualism and the reduction of form and color to a universal artistic vocabulary. Kim’s grid, however, alludes to a host of sources such as paint swatches, postcards, and other ephemera; yet, his gridded works are more intense in color and their configuration in the exhibition space feign stained glass that one would find in a church. In shifting through the profane and sacred, these works convey much about the status of painting today.  In one sense, this has been a concern of Kim since he took up the easel and brush, so to speak. This later statement is voiced self-consciously, for Kim is anything but the conventional painter. It is true that he may use the historical tropes of painting, but he continuously seeks newer modes of their reconfiguration clued from the most disparate of sources. And this is especially so in the most formally and conceptually ambitious artworks in the exhibition, which consist of a series of mixed media pieces that continue the motif of trees in a forest, but here the backgrounds were gray and superimposed with a thick white line.   Consisting of imagery of tree branches on printed canvas, these works were intervened with a white line that was slightly hallucinatory as it was conceptual.  The jarring imposition of white offset the branches yet the artworks seamlessly cohered together as a composition. Although one could see that the perspective was as if one was looking up through tree branches, as a vista into the unknown they were not dissimilar to Rodney Graham’s large-scale photographs of upside down trees.  The relationship between Graham and Kim has nothing to with media per se, but in the way that Kim was able to render something so innocuous as tree branches in an uncanny and unsettling manner. This was achieved by the highly mimetic rendition of the trees on the one hand, and on the other was the disruption of vision imposed by the white line. The white line also tended to destabilize the trees to the degree that they seemed to shape-shift into squiggles of pure abstraction. And in a very odd way, Kim has charted a kind of Mobius strip trajectory in returning to previous painterly strategies by way of their inversion: whereas the early works appear to materialize in the register of pure abstraction and then formally ebb into landscapes replete with horizons, the latter works addressed above start off adamantly representational and then seem to morph into the amorphous. In short, the works collectively embody well their exhibition’s puzzling and open-ended subtitle.              For without a doubt, Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line was an exceptional exhibition by an artist who continues to search for new and fresh ways to invigorate painting through the reconfiguration of historical modes of mark making. And these, of course, began from the first instances of delineated lines on the walls of the caves of Lascaux, to where now Eel Kwon Kim has currently extended them; that is to say, onto infinity.                                        김일권 05-14
13 Eelkwon Kim: Meditation, Abstraction and Natural Peace 인기글 Eelkwon Kim: Meditation, Abstraction and Natural Peace by  Eleanor Heartney  ( Art in America )   Painting is a solitary endeavor that leads to personal happiness and social anxiety. Painters often think they must spend more time in the studio, ever more time away from families, friends and the general population. What happens when an artist is unable to inhabit the studio where a creative mind can range freely over ideas, colors, patterns, forms, objects and fantasies? Of course it depends on the temperament of the individual painter. But I think it can be truthfully said that studio anxiety drives many painters to extreme frustration and depression that, as art history records, is an unfortunate side effect to the endless joy of painting.   Meditations on the profundities of Nature and Spirit are often considered the cerebral foundations of the concepts of minimal art. Minimalists find universes in meditative nothingness. As a result, they suffer. Truth can only be found through suffering along with ecstasy. Minimalist perceptions can’t be understood by most materialists, those who only believe in the tangible.   Eelkwon Kim states, “But I found an artist’s escape from this lonely pain by focusing my energy on helping others in the same tortuous artistic state, by being their mentor and lifetime supporter.”   We see his natural purity in his simple, compelling monotone, ambiguous paintings: one may say that they encompass everything and carry all. They answer the eternal question of Meditation: “What is the mind/body/spirit asking for in a human body?”   Korea is a painter’s paradise because its traditional cultural history includes the visual arts. When a student shows aptitude for drawing and painting, Korean schoolmasters encourage the budding young artist with classes and support. But of course there’s a catch. Art loving Koreans want to maintain tradition but also step into the contemporary art of the times they live in. Traditional yet modern lives create an unending contrast, conflict and even compromise for artists.   Eelkwon Kim dramatically lives in both the Korean traditional artist’s past and the contemporary international painter’s abstract meditative present. How does an artist reconcile these emotional aspects within himself and still experience the world?   Through his paintings Kim declares that the meditative mind leads to meditative art. Witness his selected, studied and in moments of clarity, his obsessive organic creative depth of abstraction. When painting, the mind must focus only on the canvas as meditative purity, revealing itself through infinite colors and emotive brush strokes. Forms are limited but eclectically vaporous. Colors create their own mind begging to be applied to canvas. It’s a mental focus that asks the artist to forget the material world and his personal reality, replacing it with an elevated vacuum of purity for the painter’s ideal and intense meditative action moment.   Looking at Kim’s paintings one immediately sees the artistic choices Kim is constantly forced to make. On one hand the allusive truth of the meditative no-mind is in a harmonious but decentralized battle with the illusion of worldly mind and imaginary property. On the other, the forces of Nature scream to be released from captivity, held in place while eternally struggling to take back the world. It’s this denial of a unified space, the separation of forces that strikes the viewer with an impact that overwhelms the senses.   Why does Eelkwon’s intense reaction focus our attention? Because he is dedicated to returning meditative art to its proper perceptual horizon in the universe’s natural garden. His paintings bind intellectual separation into a tightly tense set of opposites that strike us both in the meditative mind and the natural body. Looking becomes a commitment to unity in perpetual, perceptual motion without an object to interfere with the pure totality of integrated Ether, Consciousness and Earth. How easy it would be to stay in such a place, meditating on the truth of the triple aspects of spirit, mind and nature. However the viewer sadly must return to the physical life to live among the materiality of society and order.   In our difficult and often painful material world, Kim ultimately finds the need to express himself. His paintings become iconic mandalas dedicated to respect for all creatures. His work inspires a possible potential state of grace equally for both the rich and powerful and the homeless. Kim believes art can recover the true human nature often lost to modernity, industry and property. For Kim, all social classes are one family that together binds a civilization even though distracted souls may ignore each other’s needs in public. Deep in the meditative mind, Kim believes everyone knows the balance that is good and the disunity that creates wrongful, unfulfilled lives.   Kim’s energy of daily life combines with his chi of painting. He seeks a long meditative and creative life with peace and wholeness. Nothing brings happiness unless it moves the artist’s life onto the plane of simplicity of both meaning and Nature. Kim sees clouds as the force of Nature that exemplifies this aspect. Without clouds, no rain, without rain, no life. Kim strives to depict his grand message of clouds as the source of life simply with visual clarity, like the sky itself. There is a humanity in the clouds that shows the viewer the brooding storm and the ecstatic subtly shaded blue sky. Passing fluffy clouds bring peace to human minds as we lazily watch white forms break into nebulous self-dividing shapes. Our meditative gaze is transferred to the Kim’s canvases returning us to serenity.   The sky in Kim’s paintings shows us Heaven’s moods, much like human temperaments. The lower earthly density gives us contrasts of intensity where less desirable and impure actions are ignoring the moral principles handed down to us, often showered from on high. The Heavens react, striking the Earth with devastation for abuses. Suffering is enormous. But Salvation is possible only if humanity returns to the purity of simplicity by living harmoniously in both human and natural worlds.   There is a chance for redemption in Kim’s embattled world. Humans must see both sides of their own natures: the natural good versus the unnatural bad. The dimensions of this quest for truth are enormous. It takes a lifetime’s struggle with Art and Nature, Material and Spiritual and finally finding peace in understanding for the artist to discover how to use his dearly acquired new intuitive knowledge.   Kim has created a dated meditation diary that reveals the loves and disappointments that he along with most sensitive people experience. He shows us that he too understands that there is no easy and lasting perfection or purity. The promises of the meditative mind are always a step away for the painter because the material of paint is grounded in industry. Transcending this corruptive invasion of the studio is one of Kim’s daily objectives.   Because Kim sees the sea and its horizon from his studio window he can watch the progress of weather, the colors of clouds, the stillness and turbulence of the sea’s surface as if it were under an abstract microscope. These observations of sky, horizon and sea are translated into forceful paintings that demand thought beyond their intrinsic nature. The symbols of lost years and opportunities, of drowned ships and sailors, of painters obscure, unknown and famous all live in Kim’s daily narratives.   Eelkwon Kim keeps the meditative promise of unity and balance so we viewers can walk the shore of his belief in the truths of a peaceful mind.     김일권 12-22
12 Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line to the Infinite By Raul Zamudio… 댓글(댓글 :1) 인기글  Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line to the Infinite  By Raul Zamudio  NYC QUEENS MUSEUM, VENICE BIENALE, SEOUL MEDIA ART BIENNALE CURATOR , WRITER, CRITIC   The exploration of a formal or thematic leitmotif is not an uncommon endeavor in modern and contemporary art. There are, for instance, aesthetically diverse artists such as Mike Kelley who worked in a broad range of media including painting, photography, work-on-paper, sculpture, video, installation, sound art and a mixture of these. And though the narratives of his works are as equally eclectic, his foci have been the investigation of a kind of Gothic, sinister and culturally entropic Americana in its myriad neurotic manifestations. On the other hand is Picasso whose historically imperative Cubism was short lived and succeeding work one could consider post-Cubist, nonetheless engaged themes of a topical as well as personal nature. In one sense, this is how one should approach the recent body of work of the artist Eel Kwon Kim. That is, as one who delves deeply into form to the degree that he has created a distinct aesthetic vocabulary, yet his signature style is protean in its ability to articulate a broad purview of subject matter.   Kim has formally explored a thematic with a razor sharp singularity yet evinces a high level of artistic accomplishment. His early works were anything but indistinguishable. Artistically incorporating vestiges of Mark Rothko’s prescient Color-Field to Robert Ryman’s monochromes, Kim’s early paintings consisted of rectangular canvases awash in two dominate colors which meet at a demarcated line that horizontally bisects the canvas; or by an area in which the two dominate hues bleed into each other. More recently, Kim expanded on this where the purity of his color fields were contaminated with offset colors thus giving his nebulous pictorial zones depth by way of chromatic palpability. As much as these canvases can be read as embodiments of pure abstraction, the delineated line or passage between large areas of color cannot resist being perceived as a horizon. What one could conclude, then, is what Kim renders is a kind of dialectical painting that formally and conceptually oscillates dichotomies of pure abstraction and representation, figure and ground, presence and absence, and being and nothingness. As if these thematic points of departure were not revelatory of the complex artistic imaginary, the early works were also given titles referring to the day they were painted including June 20, 2003 and October 30, 2003, for example. The titles serve more than demarcations of time, however, for they not only encapsulate the arc of their creation but are also metaphorically embedded, to a lesser of greater degree, with the interiority of their author on the day of their manufacture. This contextualization of the early work of Eel Kwon Kim serves as touchstone to help us understand the artist’s most recent exhibition titled Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line, which was held from January 9-22, 2015 at the Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Gallery in New York City.   The exhibition was one of the most demure yet ambitious shows of New York City’s fall and winter season for numerous reasons. The exhibition commenced with interesting curatorial strategies: the presentation was, in a very idiosyncratic way, a macrocosm of what one finds in his early paintings. That is, the delineated line or chromatic passage between the two registers of color present in Kim’s canvases, are now incarnated in the works themselves as they sequentially cut a line across the exhibition walls. And the two areas of adjacent color that exist on either side of his paintings are not only the areas above and below them in the exhibition, but the voluminous gallery where people move about, view the artworks, and engage with each other. In short, it is the space of life itself.  This conceptual undercurrent is employed as foil in Kim’s art and by extension, is part and parcel of his approach to painting as well. There is a sublime quality to Kim’s modus operandi and like any art of a rigorous order, it is often not ostensibly apparent.  Nonetheless, Kim’s paintings of years past and of the moment encompass an aesthetic dimension and a visual poetics and logic that convey subject matter of a philosophical nature, among other narratives.   While the exhibition is a unified whole, Kim has introduced myriad works that take his previous paintings in altogether different conceptual direction. One group of canvases maintains the formal device of the bisected line, but in this case the artist covered their surfaces with an opaque wash imbuing them with a mysterious yet sensuous atmosphere. If we continue to read these new paintings as abstracted landscapes, these surface effects not only give the paintings depth but also create a mist that heightens the tension between representation and pure abstraction. The specter that Kim permeates his pictures with is like an aesthetic phantom in its haunting visual ectoplasm. Think of Leonardo Da Vinci’s sfumato, but in this case Kim has updated this trope with an altogether different connotation. To be sure, the mist that on finds in the painting is emphatically a formal device, but there is a certain degree of signification that permeates this monochromatic ambiance. In the wake of exceeding global pollution and contamination, then, is Kim addressing these matters in a work that is both visually exuberant as it is harrowing because of its potential subject matter? While one can only speculate as to the context of these particular paintings’ creation, Kim does present another body of work in the exhibition that may highlight what these works entail? These works are not as seemingly abstract and consist of imagery of black trees with different colored backgrounds including one in matte black finish and another in muted, lime green.     Reminiscent of Caspar David Friedrich’s Gothic cemetery landscapes, the vantage point in these two paintings is from below looking upward through a thicket of trees into a flattened sky. What is evoked, however, is not anything sinister but a truncated arbor of melancholy and pathos. Kim reminds us with artistic deftness and aplomb that nature is anything but natural. In other words, because nature is named by way of culture, that it too is a social construct. But Kim’s rendition of trees with their social subtext is not artistic relativism, for he extrapolates from them a sentience that is emotive and poetic.  Other works that stood out include a series of work-on-paper that were combined together to create a grid. The grid is a paradigm of Modernist abstraction evinced in the works of Piet Mondrian and his Neo-Plastic rhetoric encompassing such things as Theosophy and spiritualism and the reduction of form and color to a universal artistic vocabulary. Kim’s grid, however, alludes to a host of sources such as paint swatches, postcards, and other ephemera; yet, his gridded works are more intense in color and their configuration in the exhibition space feign stained glass that one would find in a church. In shifting through the profane and sacred, these works convey much about the status of painting today.  In one sense, this has been a concern of Kim since he took up the easel and brush, so to speak. This later statement is voiced self-consciously, for Kim is anything but the conventional painter. It is true that he may use the historical tropes of painting, but he continuously seeks newer modes of their reconfiguration clued from the most disparate of sources. And this is especially so in the most formally and conceptually ambitious artworks in the exhibition, which consist of a series of mixed media pieces that continue the motif of trees in a forest, but here the backgrounds were gray and superimposed with a thick white line.   Consisting of imagery of tree branches on printed canvas, these works were intervened with a white line that was slightly hallucinatory as it was conceptual.  The jarring imposition of white offset the branches yet the artworks seamlessly cohered together as a composition. Although one could see that the perspective was as if one was looking up through tree branches, as a vista into the unknown they were not dissimilar to Rodney Graham’s large-scale photographs of upside down trees.  The relationship between Graham and Kim has nothing to with media per se, but in the way that Kim was able to render something so innocuous as tree branches in an uncanny and unsettling manner. This was achieved by the highly mimetic rendition of the trees on the one hand, and on the other was the disruption of vision imposed by the white line. The white line also tended to destabilize the trees to the degree that they seemed to shape-shift into squiggles of pure abstraction. And in a very odd way, Kim has charted a kind of Mobius strip trajectory in returning to previous painterly strategies by way of their inversion: whereas the early works appear to materialize in the register of pure abstraction and then formally ebb into landscapes replete with horizons, the latter works addressed above start off adamantly representational and then seem to morph into the amorphous. In short, the works collectively embody well their exhibition’s puzzling and open-ended subtitle.              For without a doubt, Eel Kwon Kim: From the Line was an exceptional exhibition by an artist who continues to search for new and fresh ways to invigorate painting through the reconfiguration of historical modes of mark making. And these, of course, began from the first instances of delineated lines on the walls of the caves of Lascaux, to where now Eel Kwon Kim has currently extended them; that is to say, onto infinity.                        김일권 12-22
11 Daydreams of Infinity Exhibition review -- Rosemary O’Neill … 인기글 Eel Kwon Kim – Recent Paintings Andre Zarre Gallery 529 West 20th Street New York, NY 10011 June 8 – July 16, 2005 Eel Kwon Kim: Daydreams of Infinity Exhibition review -- Rosemary O’Neill , Dean of Parsons School of Design In Gaston Bachelard’s remarkable publication The Poetics of Space (1958), his phenomenological approach to articulating the relationship between space and the poetic imagination argues for the elimination of the artificial boundaries that separate the life of the spirit with that of the world we engage with our vision.  The contemplative daydream, according to Bachelard, “bears the mark of infinity” and it can be constructed in poetry and art in such a way that “intimacy and immensity co-exist.”  An imaginative opening- up enables the artist to transcend the banalities and temporary conditions of daily life thereby assimilating what is perceived with the ineffable sensed by the spirit.  Bachelard’s views on the poetics of space are apropos the paintings by Eel Kwon Kim. Kim’s bi-partitioned canvases of color fields evoke landscapes subtly adjusted to the rhythms of seasonal change.  In their repetitive format, Kim asserts an artistic conviction that links his work with the history of romantic and transcendental artists and poets with precedents in both the East and the West.  The dualities of the physical and spiritual –increasingly separated in our materially driven world – can still be blurred in our experience of nature with its consolidation of stability and change.  Kim’s painterly language is recognizable and it holds onto a modernist yearning for a space beyond time and place.  His paintings seek to convey a deeper content as he has stated.  “My images are full of the ambiance of representational minimalism; they are not in their flatness to be read as formal exercises but rather as content loaded themes that contain nature and are also emotional realities for creating order in nature.”  There is a quiet resolve in this work that insinuates itself into the psyche – an eidetic practice that is both recognizable and revealing; Kim weaves memory with aspiration. Most of his works are titled by a designated month, day and year – a visual diary of recorded sensations that is distinct from the austere conceptualism of artists such as On Kawara.  In Kim’s work, time is dominated by his mode of representation.   His work is antithetical to the immediacy of the moment or information conveyance; for one sees in this painting a communication which aims for duration, and an articulation that eschews the prosaic. Kim’s works eliminate all that intrudes on a visual experience of deep resonating energy produced by the surfaces rich with color light, accomplished by layers of subtle under painting.   Bachelard also considered the co-existence of the intimacy and the immensity of space in relation to Charles Baudelaire’s notion of vastness -- “to breathe with the air that rests on the horizon.”  It is that omnipresent horizon in Kim’s work that affords the viewer a gentle but effective visual invigoration. There is a spiritual optimism in Kim’s work – a poetry of spatial relations that enables the mind to sense where the material and the ephemeral briefly touch.      김일권 08-21
10 Phantasmic and Other Landscapes Thalia Vrachopoulos Ph.D in … 댓글(댓글 :159) 인기글 Eel Kwon Kim: Phantasmic and Other Landscapes In his review entitled Eel Kwon Kim: The New Landscape, Robert C. Morgan noted that no prediction could be made in the future direction of this artist. He described Kim’s work as neither representational nor abstract but rather melding both styles that in Kim’s landscapes appear natural and “in tune with one another.”??While true that Kim’s landscapes are abstracted, rather than totally abstract they are not a result of a reductive process rather they emerge like Athena from Zeus head, fully matured from the artist’s imagination. While representational landscapes act as potent signs of specific place or class, and are socially relevant, Kim’s evocative landscapes offer hope, for in them is a space for dreaming, an alternative to the city or suburb of reality, a place where anything is possible. Traditional landscape dismissed at times as decorative, has functioned as social cipher whose content is replete with ideology, place or politics. But, in Kim’s case it is a landscape crammed with conceptual significance and artistic autonomy, assuring a place for independent artistic production. Perhaps it is not critical in the sense that it examines environmental, or political issues, but it is social in its espousal of humanist content affording the viewer the possibility of hope. Kim’s titles such as 02-28-05, February 20, 2005 are date specific and in this sense they can be related to On Kawara’s date paintings, while his landscapes are timeless and phantasmagoric. The time element also plays a crucial role in Kim’s landscapes but not to the extent of Kawara who destroys his dated work if not finished the same day. While the date is also important to Kim, it serves as a marker for remembering time extended to fit his own needs, as if asserting the day’s extension into imaginary time to become the sublime landscape. Robert C. Morgan. NYArts, May/June, 2005, pps 86-87 Kim’s colors are expertly blended to arrive at a softness or dreamy blurriness in tonalities that have developed from his last body of work into even softer greens, plums, and umbers. As seen in his 05-20-03, May 20th, 2005, there are underlying blues mixed with soft yellows to arrive at the ever so gentle greens of this landscape. His coloration does not so much suggest a time of day as to hint at a kind of light or weather effect but unlike the envelope of Monet whose preoccupation was with the effects of light on color. Rather Kim’s paintings evince the artist’s interest in manifesting his own imaginary place and time. Kim’s direction is evident in these coloristically adept canvases that in their poetic content show the artist’s dedication and perspicacity towards ever-greater virtuosity. 김일권 08-21
9 Eel kwon Kim: The New Landscape, essay by Robert C. Morgan, … 인기글 The landscape has been a persistent theme in art for centuries.  As a tradition in painting, it has been practiced in both Eastern and Western cultures for many centuries. Today the cultures are no longer so distant as they one were. In the current era of cultural globalization, a new kind of synthesis has evolved.  Although each has its own specific character as to how to paint the landscape, the means by which new concepts and methods are considered and understood is more connected than ever before.  There is less emphasis given to hierarchies in artistic expression and more attention to common goals.  In such a climate the theme of the landscape takes on a new significance, not only as a purely representational or linguistic phenomenon, but as a neo-metaphysical phenomenon as well. Here I refer specifically to the paintings of the Korean artist Eel Kwon Kim. To see these paintings, and to encapsulate their significance, is to go beyond the normative perception of how a landscape is seen or understand.  Kims landscapes have a direct reference to abstract painting.  They operate as a hinge between the two -- representation and abstraction -- as a fulcrum, a balance beam, a way of seeing into the future.  Kims series, entitled  Calm :Land,  constitutes a kind of prophetic seismograph, a warning without deliberate calculation, a way of thinking and feeling in relation to the self.  Kim understands that viewing the landscape is an intrinsic metaphysical action, a way of coming to terms with the reality of nature, with the infinity of the horizon line, with the calmness of the self, the solitude, the infinite grandeur of spiritual being in a world torn apart by fear and greed.   Kims paintings constitute a kind of seeing that envisions the future in relation to the past -- that sees the Eastern traditions of landscape painting as having a succinct calmness, a meaning without equivocation, a feeling of intrepid comprehension and contemplation.  Here one may discover a universe of human emotion and an atmosphere of galaxies that reign over our feeling as we move through time and space. As I wander through the gallery in search of a pivot, a grasp, a solace, where the rectitude of understanding might merge with the sensation of emotion, I come upon a painting, inscribed in Korean, with umber and ochre mixed into a black and white field, a horizon dividing a section of the land with a larger section of the sky.  It is titled  Calm Land (12.07.01).   I think immediately of the series of last Rothko paintings that I saw initially at the Marlborough Galleries (at the recommendation of the painter Robert Motherwell) in 1970.  Here in these galleries, these stark and simplistic paintings by Rothko were juxtaposed with the thinly attenuated figurations by Giacometti.  But here at the Gallery Korea in New York I see a similar phenomenon, a painting that captures some of what I recall from more than thirty years earlier.  The scale of Kims paintings is generally reduced, and the passage from representation to abstraction has taken a different course.  The extravagant maneuver (which many never grasped) in Rothko is not the same as in the paintings of Eel Kwon Kim.  Kims paintings are smaller, more delicate and in some ways more vibrant, more of their own accord, less desperate, less fraught with despair.  Still, Kims paintings are somehow on the edge, on the verge of something -- some event -- about to happen, or maybe something that has just occurred.  In each of these  Calm Land  paintings by Kim there is the desire to come to terms with reality as a horizon, as land and sky, as a bifurcation., as a dialectical encounter with an unforeseen reality that touches upon the most basic, the most fundamental human experience: the emotions stirred in the perceiver in the act of being a work of art. I look again -- this time at another small abstract landscape, a painting that offers another kind of solace, entitled  Calm Land (01.12.01).  Kim tends to number the individual paintings rather than title them as if they were all part of a single combined unit of time and space, a matter of relativity, where the gravitational pull is also an ascendancy forever given back to the horizon of the Earth.  The landscape has very little modulation, almost no sign of activity of the horizon; yet one is aware of the brush -- the way the brush has defined the landscape, the land in relation to the sky.  The blackness in the land and the mixture of mauve and yellow in the sky suggests that the light has gone down or is about to rise.  There is the passage between darkness and lightness.  There is a solemn stillness, an awakening, a transposition from one moment to the next.  The sound is as apparent as the vision.  Compared to a sister painting,  Calm Land (11.27.00),  there is the sense that the light has come into the sky and that the land is beckoning the events of the day.  The spirit of motion, of travel, of taking part in the quotidian returns of the day are very much in evidence. But there is no prediction in the direction these landscapes will take. In  Calm Land (01.05.00)  the sensation of ocean waves breaks through the night.  The viewer is arbitrarily standing at the seaside watching this extravagant, though sublime phenomenon in nature.  The horizon is disturbed.  The brushstroke in its simple, recondite, and calligraphic manner interrupts the typical stillness.  We are poised in front of the sea -- yet still, not as a pure representation, but as a hint of something universal in nature.  The effect is ultimately one of pulling together the representational and abstract elements in painting -- both belonging to nature -- in tune with one another.  Eel Kwon Kim is tuning the perceivers eye to the sensation of the thing perceived, the role of nature as an objective variant, a crustacean form, a primeval event that takes us homeward into the self, into the vacant regions of the soul, where the transformation from dark to light emerges and we become whole again. Robert C. Morgan is a writer, international art critic, curator, poet, lecturer, and artist. His recent books include Art into Ideas: Essays on Conceptual Art (1996), Between Modern and Conceptual Art (1997), The End of the Art World (1998), Gary Hill (2000), Bruce Nauman (2002), and Clement Greenberg: Late Writings (2003).  He writes for Art News (New York) and Art Press (Paris) and is a Contributing Editor for Sculpture Magazine (USA) and Tema Celeste (Milan).  He holds both an MFA in Sculpture and a Ph.D. in Art History.  He is currently adjunct Professor of Fine Art at Pratt Institute.  In 1999, he was awarded the Arcale Award for Art Criticism in 김일권 08-21
8 Clinton Kuopus Director of Exhibitions and Faculty Parsons S… 인기글 Eel Kwon Kim "a painter's painter"    Eel Kwon Kim works in a very limited spatial framework based on more or less classical ideas about abstract issues regarding landscape.....atmosphere and ground. To an uninitiated eye they might actually seem to be banal and incredibly reductive or simplistic.....they might be considered to be boring......but I assure you, they are anything but that. They are sophisticated, wonderfully painted, and a visual feast for the viewer to move back and forth from Image to image experiencing the subtle differences from one to another and how they exude very different qualities of emotion and visual sensitivity. If you are willing to let them, they suck you into the visual landscape in front of you in a different way each time.     Eel Kwon Kim has painted over 200 of these works, all the same size and with the same format. This is something that is very hard to do and still keep the images fresh and different from one to the other. He paints them on different days, in different seasons of the year, at different times of the day. We are all different people to some degree on different days. The world and our environments are different each day as well. Eel Kwon Kim plays on this aspect of human experience and shares his spirit and soul with the viewer in describing Korea and his existence as an artist and fellow human being in his visual dialogues with us. The core of Korea's history and cultural roots are based on respect for nature, life, simple elegance, sensitivity and human emotion. These prime elements of Korean Culture are amplified by Eel Kwon Kim's work. They are sensitive, extremely well painted and communicate with the viewer on a very spiritual level. The term "a painter's painter" is often described as one who is a master of "edge", color manipulation, application and the inherent means of really communicating through his or her craft.    Eel Kwon Kim is one such individual. His layering, underpainting, overpainting, brushstrokes and application are all at once, inviting, succulent and alluring. The way that his atmosphere or sky meets earth or ground is a wonderfully controlled marriage of both aspects of landscape through "edge". I was reminded of Rothko and his working in a limited format and how powerful his work became when he was really on point. Eel Kwon Kim's work shares in this intent and succeeds in a much different and subtle way......and with a much more limited self imposed format. This takes tremendous courage, sensitivity, stubbornness and tenacity to pull off and are as admirable in describing the artist as they are the backbone of his creative spirit. 김일권 08-21
7 Thalia Vrachopoulos Ph.D in art history, curator, professor … 인기글 The Palimpsest and sublime in Eel Kwon Kim's Landscapes The sublime is that quality in art robert Rosenblum associated with shapelessness awesomeness and the mysterious aspects of a Romantic landscape, Kim's landscapes are every bit mysterious, suggestive, and even ecstatic in their sublime suggestion of possibilities. His softly nuanced paintings are economical in their means yet speak volumes in their complexity. This layering and its super-inscription or super-imposition is referred to as the palimpsest effect. As signs if a linguistic model, Kim's landscapes are embedded with multi-layered symbolism that functions in terms of repetition and, their signifieds become inconstant shifting and exchanging places with their signifiers. Through repetition Kim's painting as sign constantly recreates its referent thereby multiplying its meaning. His works can be read as metaphorical abstract landscapes with a tripartite division of foreground, horizon/middle ground, and background. Or, they can be seen as studies into sensation and color wherein the media assume primacy. An alternative reading would assert a spiritual element in Kim's landscapes due ti their devotional, evocative qualities. Kim's work should not simply be associated with abstract expressionism or minimalism as critics have done in the past, but it should also bo seen in light of its metaphorical and symbolic meaning. the most compelling aspect of Kim's painting is that this complex tapestry of veiled metaphoric significance and visual acuity captivate and resonate with his viewer. Kim's surfaces through the presence of the artist's hand their evident brushwork soften and humanize his otherwise economic expanses. This emotional brushwork combined with thick painterly impastos of gradated tones as seen in the horizon of november 12th, 2003, implies a nebulousness that appears as atmospheric effect. Suggestive and sensual in its application and texture, as well as its sublime expanses, this aspect in view of the artist's biography, can also have spiritual connotations. Kim grew up urban centers of south korea and painted figures and nature, as indicated by his art school training. Continuing along these lines until approximately 1992, he than began to develop his landscape technique away from academic models and focused less on the figure. Because his early work is dark, drab and usually about a lone crouching figure or war torn landscape, it is my contention that kim found solace in the devotional landscapes of his subsequent periods. There are sensuous, painterly, quiet and spiritual landscapes that offer the artist an inner peace as well as physical tranquility within which to work. His expanses are fraught with layered meaning concerning human struggle, in a world full of gravity where painful experience coagulates into thick accumulation. Albeit full of pathos, the comfort Kim derives from his landscapes enables him to see the bigger picture that can only be viewed in terms of the whole as a collective aggregation of experience. This taoist view of life is macroscopic in its overall scope assigning man an infintessimal place in the overall scheme of things where virtue is seen as conformity to nature. Kim's November 30th, 2003 is a landscape painted in varied plums and cherry tones with a tiny vertical element in the middle ground, that can be read as a tiny human presence or fishing boat which can be understood through a taoist perspective. Kim constantly reinvents boat himself and his metier although ostensibly appearing to be related to the much earlier style of abstract expressionism. Ironically, he is often seen in terms of mark rothko who wholeheartedly denied his work's relationship to landscape. Thus while Kim acknowledges the conceptual association with landscape as solace and accretion of human experience, rothko rejects its reading as landscapes as a simple one. Anna C. Chave is her Mark Rothko; subjects in Abstraction(yale,1998)points to the association by many critics of his works to the landscape and acknowledges this reading as a possibility. But, she points out that rothko(like Kim)lived in an urban environment and became restless when in the countryside. Nevertheless Chave asserts that Rothko's works can still be read as landscapes but also discusses some problems in such a take. Rothko's earlier work consist of figural scenes that Chave rightly claims do not disappear in his later work, but rather become signs comprising abstract symbolic rectangles in his preferred vertical format. A similar case can be made for Kim who also presents us with this type of ambiguity in that he uses a vertical format for the landscape, which is raditionally painted on horizontal canvases. The vertical orientation is more agreeable to portraits, which makes sense given Kim's earlier portraiture period. Kim however, has now reduced the human presence to a tiny increment coupled with a huge landscape to produce emotional discourses of cosmic proportions. and like the ocean waves that 김일권 08-21
6 Raul Zamudio curator Liverpool Biennial, Venice Biennial 인기글 The Eel Kwon Kim: a day in the life of a painting in James Joyce's Ulysses, a 732 page work that is considered a milestone in modernist literature, the story begins and ends all in one day : June 13, 1903. An epic of labyrinthine proportions, the compression of time in joyce's novel is extended in myriad directions through a dense array of literary tropes. This in one sense can be construed as a conceptual work par excellence. Its former similarly uses temporality as a eternity. Gonzalez Torres is more congnizant of the historicity of dates as evinced in his untitled series of conceptualy text-based works, where rather than just incorporating a single date like Kawara, his dates run sequentially. Kawara is known for his paintings; pictures consisting of a date painted usually in white and set against a monochromatic background. Sometimes the dates refer to when the works were made; other times there are specific reasons for capturing time; A political event, a personal moment, a meaningful instance in history's ebb and flow. Working against this mode are gonzalez-torres' "date" pieces that operate in more overt political registers. In one particular work there are a series of dates beginning with the arrest of oscar wilde, the U.S. supreme court's ruling outlawing homosexuality, the date of the stone wall rebellion in new work city that inaugurated gay right, and finally ending whit the year the aids epidemic began. Both artist and their individual dating strategies, while seemingly mundane yet intellectually demanding and poetic, are also part of the formal and conceptual modus operandi of the recent paintings of Eel kwon Kim. Kim's recent body of pictures is equally as complex as one is immediately made aware of this by their titles that consist of date and that convey an almost serendipitous air; January 1st,2003, February 16th, 2003, February 30th and so forth. The works are characterized by what appear to be wide expanses of a lighter shad of color at the upper half of the painting, which are compositionally anchored by subtle, darker tones at the bottom third of picture. How can the paintings represent or allude to what is stated in their titles? The only way is to try to interpret them a narrative is to unpack what has occurred on the day they were pained; and although there are evocations of both abstraction and representation in the paintings, The dates linger as an open-ended question creating a sense of the uncanny as one is motivated to understand the puzzling nature of Kim's titles. on the one hand there exists what is within the confines of the painting; swaths of wash-like, monochromatic fields that abstractly refer to something recognizable. Juxtaposed with these passages of color is the date that is used as referent or sign that points to the world outside of painting. but time is an abstraction. so what Kim is resenting in his painting is the equivalency of visual/linguistic Borromean knot or mobius strip. for Kim's use of time as referent is something tat pihlosophycally festers and gestates in the thought processes and its effect is akin to a mobius strip that twists and turns in the mind's eye. It is true that almost all artist date their paintings, but they usually do so by the year they made. A more literal approach to the understanding of kim's use of dating via an individual day might simply be that it refers to the day they were made. but even this interpretation is saturated with an ostensible array of possibilities. Within the temporal bracket of a day, what is it that has occurred  in the span of Kim's artistic endeavor? each mark on the canvas could be nearly and temporally divided; but this positivist redundancy reveals nothing of the philosophical rigor that is the bedrock of Kim's paintings. for like Gonzalez-Torres, Kim shifts the terms of engagement on to the viewer what does the date signify for each person who views a painting titled January 20th . 2003? Numerous events occurred on this date where persons were affected with joy. sadness hope, violence, life, death and everything else that runs the gamut of humanity in the positive and negative sense. what would happen if Kim would have dated one of his paintings september 11th, 2001, The same day as one of the most horrific moments in U.S. history? in other words time is not transparent and is a fabrication that it is inundated with our desires that we project onto it. But Kim's epistemological interrogation is only one of the numerous registers of his formal and conceptual operation. There is also the ontological question that Kim addresses as well . Kim's work traverses the history of painting by pilfering aesthetic modes such as representation and abstraction. He ciphers this polarity through a conceptual framework that includes dichotomies as compression and extension, duration and the instance, material and the immaterial, and particular and the gestalt. He proposes a model of painting that has spilled out into the world by seizing and corralling it within a twenty- four hour period. It is said that certain creatures live for the duration of day; Kim's "Date" paintings palpitate with life beyond the parameters of their temporal designations' for they continue to oscillate like a ticking clock between the past and the present, between the day they were made and the moment they are viewed. 김일권 08-21
5 SEOUL NATIONAL MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART Director Oh, Gwang… 인기글 Director  Oh, Gwang-Soo, Eel Kwon Kim's works have an ambiguity both imaginative and even representational.and open the way of thought with abaundant sensitivity and symbolic abstract. sensitivity thought representational. he leads us to the way of paint  for making a space of concepts which seems to be far a way horizon on the canvas omitting detailed descriptions. With unfinished thoughts, he compatibly painted the trap that represetative work have. HEAD CURATOR   Jang, Young - Jun Eel-kwon Kim send the implicative message to return the historical and spiritual traces that is resolved in the lives of human beings to the order of nature by materializing those traces. The flash of madness in colorless tone, even bloomy at a glimpse, is a thread of his painful expression to obtain a new-self through disclosing himself.The human beings and nature of his works illustrate the wandering spirits of isolated and frustrated people of modern society and make an indirect comment on the existence of human beings suffering in the dark matters of life.   김일권 08-21
4 (Artist Note) EEL KWON KIM 인기글 In most of my works, simplified and intensified expressions are to be always reflected in the world, to show myself to others and accept delicate emotional materials. My works are to find ways to easily understand images in physical relatives of media that I treat, which as not satisfied my feeling fully. In terms of familiar expressions without painting outward appearance, essential searches for objects are to express my life containing emotional experiences and the world containing the power of image. My pictures are full of climates of representational minimalism. They are not nature itself, but emotional reality for creating the order in nature understandably, Also they, which are observed in the trace of my life, represent not only physical touches but also emotional gravity. Thoughts on Time  in my interactive art works In time partial and fragmented within whole, the reproduction of images continues as an integral journey. Consecutive images, as if time zero is divided into 0 and 1, come into being and gradually vanish. The screen onto which oneself is projected represents compact and multi-layered images like the empty looks of time. Images of generation and extinction constantly alternate between temporary presence and absence. They are exposures of the perspectives, perceptions and insights of Being, and then permanent creation, repetition and termination of comprehensive images questing for eternal estrangement. In the current of time and self, the artist searches for a possibility of creating new images through repetitive reproduction of  slowly elapsing time images, and further seeks to achieve ontological reflection and another image of eternity. 김일권 08-21
3 Art speak 1992.06 New York, Martin Parsons 인기글 Eelkwon kim, a former student of Eric Fischl, is a bold young figure painter whose work is very much in the New Wave vein, yet has a distinctly Korean feeling. His ruggedly painted single figures are all about the body, its sensuality, its mortality, its raw physicality, Emerging frame dark backgrounds on unstretched canvases, his figures make one think of older painters, such as Francis bacon and A Alberto Giacometti,   yet have a freshness and originality all their own, Eelkwon Kim capures the raw presence of the figure, rather than its particulars. 김일권 08-21
2 Park East 1991.10 New York, Dorothy Hal 인기글 Eelkwon Kim from Korea has a mabelously done painting, "Calm Land", an evocative scene with excellent light treatment, it is as if one glimpses a landscape through a window.    김일권 08-21
1 Art speak 1991.10 New York, Zoltan Hegyes 인기글 Eelkwon Kim is a talented painter, with a penchant for strong forms and dark, earthy colors. Kim's bold brush-strokes capture the essence of such subjects as the mountainous landscape in "Calm Land" The painting of a buxom female nude is especially strong, with its rethymical, semi-abstract treatment of the figure. 김일권 08-21
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